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Egypt demonstrations forced Morsi to address the nation, constitution is nearly finished

PUBLISHED  04:00 November 29, 2012

By Karafillis Giannoulis

Now Reading: Egypt demonstrations forced Morsi to address the nation, constitution is nearly finished
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On 29 November, Egypt demonstrations against President’s Mohamed Morsi decision to expand his powers, forced the President to issue a public address at 7 p.m local time in order to call for national unity. In addition, government officials announced that today the country’s new constitution will be put to vote on Egypt’s Constituent Assembly.

With these communicational and political acts, President Morsi hopes to ease the tension created by the demonstrations. However, Al-Masry Al-Youm reported that political and revolutionary groups called on Wednesday for mass Egypt demonstrations in Tahris Square on 30 November. The demonstrations are being called "Revoke or Leave" and, according to the article, they will begin in each city at main mosques after Friday prayer. The demonstrators will march to squares and possibly to the Shura Council and presidential palace.

According to Deutsche Welle tens of thousands of protesters gathered in Tahrir Square on Wednesday, and clashes erupted between police and protesters. On 27 November, protesters stormed offices of the Muslim Brotherhood’s Freedom and Justice Party in three cities. According to rumours Morsi’s government was thinking to involve the army in the conflict between the government and the protesters. However, a member of the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces said that the Egyptian army will not get involved in the conflict between the two parts, “because if the military got involved now it would ultimately regret the decision and come under attack from both sides.”

Talaat Marzouk, an assembly member from the Salafi Nour Party said, “the constitution is in its last phases and will be put to a referendum soon and God willing it will solve a lot of the problems in the street.”

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